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Home & Garden | Safety | March 22, 2020

Weed Spraying Safety Tips

Gardening Spraying Gly-Star Crossbow Weedmaster Sprays Weeds Safety Farming

Weed Spraying Safety Tips

Weeds can get out of control fast, especially if you’re managing more than a few acres of land. Using herbicides like Gly Star®, Weedmaster, Crossbow, and more from Coastal are great options. But it’s important to apply them safely. We’ve compiled a quick and easy list of must-dos to keep you, your family, and animals safe.

Read the Label Carefully

You’ll find all the information you need, including what to do if you inhale or come in contact with an herbicide. Some labels will list personal protection equipment necessary to apply the product safely. Most labels will indicate how long you, pets, and livestock should stay out of the area after application to reduce harmful exposure. When reading the label, look for one of four EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) caution words. These will give you a quick snapshot of the chemical’s toxicity. These include CAUTION (relatively non-toxic), WARNING (could cause illness if swallowed, inhaled or exposed to skin), DANGER (highly toxic), and the skull and crossbones we all know as poisonous.

Only Mix What You Need

Some herbicides are pre-mixed, but others are concentrated and require a bit of measuring and mixing. Before you start adding chemicals to water, measure the area where you plan to spray. There’s no sense in wasting money on herbicides you might not use.

Don’t Use Items from the Kitchen

When mixing and measuring chemicals for the farm, don’t use items from the kitchen. A dedicated measuring cup and stirring stick or spoon are great investments. Label them “Farm Only” to avoid any mix-ups.

Know Your Exposure Points

There are four ways that chemicals can come into contact with you. These include dermal (getting it on your skin), inhalation (breathing it in), ocular (getting it into your eyes), and oral (swallowing it). That’s why it’s important to wear protective gear.

Wear Protective Gear

Using herbicides almost never goes exactly as planned. After all, handles leak and spray drifts with the wind. If there’s a chance you can get some chemicals on your skin, cover that area up. If you might breathe it or get it in your eyes, wear goggles or a respirator.

Personal protective equipment includes:

  • Long-sleeve shirt and pants
  • Chemical-resistant boots or slip-on shoe covers
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
  • Face shield or goggles
  • Dust mask or full respirator
  • Jumpsuit that is either disposable or easily cleaned
  • Rubber apron for mixing chemicals

Get Your Weed-Eliminating Supplies at Coastal

You’ll find a full line of sprayers and attachments, including large-capacity spot sprayers for your farm and ranch rigs at your Northwest owned and operated Coastal. You’ll also find plenty of tools and people who can show you how to dilute herbicides properly.

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