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Ag News | January 28, 2019

Coastal Ag News Roundup

Ag News
In today’s Ag News Roundup, Americans will eat 1.3 billion chicken wings this Sunday, AI and ag working together, WSDA hosting gypsy moth open houses, more acreage could be irrigated in Columbia basin, public land grazing not affected by shutdown.

More than 1.3 Billion Chicken Wings will Be Eaten During Big Game

According to the National Chicken Council and the annual Chicken Wing Report, Americans will eat 1.38 billion wings during Super Bowl Sunday. The report cites that chicken wings are the most consumed food during the big game.

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Artificial Intelligence and Agriculture to Work Together

An award-winning Washington State University scientist has announced plans to design apple-picking robots, smart irrigation systems for grapes, and special drones that can deter birds. According to experts, advancements in agriculture over the next 20 years could change the industry in many positive ways.

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Gypsy Moth Open Houses Scheduled

The Washington State Department of Agriculture is hosing four open house Ask the Expert events in affected communities. Those interested are urged to come and chat with experts during the open times. See dates, locations and times in the full story.

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Columbia Basin Project Could be Boon for Region

From the Washington Agriculture Network, the current Columbia Basin irrigates 671,000 acres, while the proposed project could boost that to 1,029,000 acres. Experts say this will boost production significantly in the region.

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Public Land Grazing Not Affected by Shutdown

The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management say that the past government shutdown and any possible future shutdowns will not affect or delay most public land grazing for ranchers. The agencies will administer the grazing program for cattle on public lands this spring.

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