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Ag News | November 21, 2017

Ag News Roundup

Ag News Farmer Homesteader
In today’s Ag News Roundup, Christmas tree permits now available, EPA awards OSU scientist, farming machinery values reach bottom, wolf attacks being investigated in Idaho, and a wet and cold winter possible in the Northwest.

Get Your National Forest Christmas Tree Permits

The perfect Christmas tree is waiting to be found it in the Umatilla, Wallowa-Whitman, and Malheur national forests. Permits are now available for $5 with a limit of one per household. Additionally, the National Parks Foundation is offering a free permit to fourth-graders as part of the Every Kid in a Park initiative. For information about permits, where to find them, and cutting restrictions, call the Forest Service office in Oregon at 541-278-3716.

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EPA Early Career Award Giving to OSU Scientist

Kelly, Biedenweg, Oregon State University Agricultural Sciences assistant professor has earned a $400,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to study ecosystem restoration and the effects on human well-being. She will be studying local watershed groups throughout the Puget Sound ecosystem.

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Late-Model Farming Machinery Values Reach Solid Bottom

The value of large equipment has reached an all-time low, says auctioneers from across the country. Experts state that high-horsepower front-wheel-drive tractors and implements will likely retain their current value well into 2018.

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USDA Wildlife Services Investigating Idaho Wolf Attacks

Idaho ranchers are being urged to report all cattle deaths to Wildlife Services as the agency conducts an ongoing investigation into wolf attacks throughout the state. The Agency has confirmed 750 wolf attacks throughout 32 Idaho counties.

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Wet and Cold Winter Ahead for the Pacific Northwest

Climatologists are predicting a wetter and colder winter thanks to the effects of La Nina. In Washington state, below-average temperatures and more precipitation are expected for the months of December through February.

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